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20121101
20121130
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KQEH (PBS) 25
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English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Nov 2, 2012 6:30pm PDT
the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york ci maratho that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more bs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor forcbs the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs wereor created last month. that's much stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september w job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people lookingco for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly t7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the key message there is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the long
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 6:30pm PDT
evening i susie gharib. u.s. stocks are trading again, after hurricane sandy forces an historic two-day shutdown. >> gom: llll street gets back to business, as damage and recovery estimates start to climb, plus,e what it takes to restore power to millions in the northeast. >> susie: and with stocks open for trading, no surpri, home depot was the dow's standout., >> tom: lots ahead, that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: an historic day on here on wall street, after the storm of the century knocked down the financial district. us stoto markets resumedtsed operations today after two days in the dark, stocks were little changed: both the dow and the nasdaq fell 10 points, but the s&p 500 gained a fraction. trading here at the new york stock exchange opened without a hitch. th new york stock exchange opened right on time. and as new york's mayor bloomberg rang the opening bell this morning, traders were happy to be back to work. it looked like a normal day, with the buzz of activity, traders milling about. it was anything but normal no one knows that better than larry leibowitz, t
PBS
Nov 1, 2012 6:30pm PDT
that encouraging report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey andew york city here's an update: four and a half million people are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have re ad atme all of the airports in the new york area.at public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and filling up on gas is the toughest problem of all. gas stations are running dry, and others do not have electricity to pump gas. motorists lined by the hundreds in new jersey, waiting and hoping for fuel. still ahead, we have more on sandy: flood insurance, the cost of getting power turned back on, and the challenge of getting around america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates th
PBS
Nov 5, 2012 6:30pm PST
: wall street is hardly back to normal, with reminders of hurricane sandy still obvious everywhere. but, at least the presidential election could provide a distraction for the coping with the storm's aftermath. the question is will the stock market continue to distract in the days following tomorrow'sng big contest? that may depend on its outcome. like many on wall street, nyse trader jonathan corpina predicts a mitt romney win will ba biga win for stock prices. >> i think when you see new regimes, new presidents come in to play isort of a turmoil time, that change is always viewed as good and the market views that as good news. >> reporter: on the other hand, corpina doesn't think the re- election of president obama will trigger a selloff.so more likely he would expect to see status quo for stocks. >> i think people have bought intohe fact that the market is going to take a long time to recover, our economy is going to take a long time to recover and the market has seemed to stay on the track so to speak.in >> reporter: of course there is also the possibility however remote, that it mi
PBS
Nov 8, 2012 6:30pm PST
economy slows down, u.s. exports may follow suit. hurricane sandy showed up in the latest report on jobless claims, making them artificially low. initial claims for unemployment benefits dropped by 8,000 to a seasonally adjusted 355,000 at the end of last week. the number is expected to be revised higher as more data is collected. the labor department says one state filed fewer claims because of power outages, while the storm boosted claims in other states where more people looking for relief. later in the program, we'll look at sandy's impact on retailers. >> tom: the biggest bank in america has the okay now from uncle sam to pay back shareholders. jpmorgan will be allowed to restart a stock buyback plan early next year. like all systemically important banks jpmorgan has to get regulatory approval to change its dividend or stock-repurchase plan. the regulators want banks to have enough financial firepower to withstand troubled times before the banks will spend money on share holders. jpmorgan's buyback strategy was suspended this year after it lost $6 billion when a derivative t
PBS
Nov 6, 2012 6:30pm PST
generic drugs, which come with higher margins. the company said hurricane sandy will hit fourth quarter earnings by about penny per share. p four of the five most tively traded e.t.f.s were higher, but the ipath s&p 500 exchangeos traded note was the weakest, down 3.5%. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> susie: in the storm-ravaged states of new york and new jersey, officials made sure everyone today would be able to vote. authorities let residents uprooted by hurricane sandy vote at any polling center in their states. in new jersey, some citizens were even allowed to cast ballots by email. as suzanne pratt reports, sandy's chaos didn't stop voters from getting to the polls. >> reporter: parsippany, new jersey, was hit hard by hurricane sandy. many homes still have no power, d many gas stations are still dry.y nevereless, residents made it vheir business to vote today, even though their polling site had to be moved at the last minute to a new location. >> reporter: in manhattan, only a handful of voting centers had to be changed because of the storm's aftermath. this site downtown
PBS
Nov 1, 2012 12:00am PDT
update the aftermath of sandy as president obama gets a first hand look at the devastation along new jersey's shoreline. >> ifill: then, how do you plan for increasingly common super storms? ray suarez examines th as part of aour series: ouping with climate citnge. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown reports on the battle of the ground game, hard fought on wisconsin's turf. >> who knew? it turns out that green bay iste one of the most swinging cities in the whole country, politically speaking, that is. we'll explain. >> ifill: the supreme court devoted its day to drusniffing dogs and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the dtional law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding or the pbs newshour has been provided by: di ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf
PBS
Nov 21, 2012 12:00am PST
with climate change" series. >> as people continue to clean up from hurricane sandy, we look at what it could take to keep this damage from happening again. >> brown: ray suarez updates the health care reform law, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school football, where a trail-blazing coach puts her players' studies ahead of practice. >> you won't be playing football. we like to think we have a lot of life to live so you will too and you need to prepare for that. football is kind of just icing on the >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank y
PBS
Nov 22, 2012 12:00am PST
from superstorm sandy continue to rise, paul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal point of families and thanksgiving: the kitchen table. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: after another day of violence, a ceasefire deal between israel and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his si
PBS
Nov 16, 2012 11:00pm PST
by the frankenstorm benignly named sandy. having surveyed all this damage "bloomberg business week" concluded: "it's global warming, stupid: if hurricane sandy doesn't persuade americans to get serious about climate change, nothing will." well it was enough to prompt president obama, at his press conference this week, to say more about global warming than he did all year. >> i am a firm believer that climate change is real, that it is impacted by human behavior and carbon emissions. and as a consequence, i think we've got an obligation to future generations to do something about it. >> but he made it clear that actually doing something about it will take a back seat to the economy for now. he did return to new york on thursday to review the recovery effort on staten island. climate change and hurricane sandy brought naomi klein to town, too. you may know her as the author of "the shock doctrine: the rise of disaster capitalism." readers of two influential magazines to put naomi klein high on the list of the 100 leading public thinkers in the world. she is now reporting for a new book and documenta
PBS
Nov 3, 2012 12:00am PDT
on worries that the costs of hurricane sandy will eat into profits. the dow jones industrial average lost 139 points to close at 13,093. the nasdaq fell almost 38 points to close at 2,982. for the week, the dow and the nasdaq were off a fraction of 1%. korean auto makers hyundai and kia could end up paying hundreds of millions of dollars to car owners as compensation for overstating fuel economy. the environmental protection agency now says an audit revealed that 13 models averaged up to six miles a gallon less than advertised. some 900,000 vehicles sold in the last three years are affected. u.s. intelligence officials have rejected claims they failed to answer the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. there've been reports the cia told its security officers to "stand down" and not try to repel the attackers. senior intelligence officials denied that on thursday. they said a security team responded within 25 minutes, en though eney were outmanneer and outgunned.ne those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: this was another difficult day in the afterm
PBS
Nov 16, 2012 12:00am PST
sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know, so as time goes, it gets worse. and i'm afraid if we don't like, really get this situation under control. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: israel and the militant group hamas slid closer to all-out war today. the israelis blasted gaza with scores of air strikes, and the palestinians said 16 people were killed there. hamas and its allies fired more than 200 rockets and even stru
PBS
Nov 6, 2012 12:00am PST
toward recovery today, one week after hurricane sandy hit. but for many in new jersey and new york, normal routines are still a longay off.lo we have two reports, beginning with an overview from kwame holman.e >> reporter: it was the closest think to a full-scale morning commute since the storm hit a week ago. it taxed transit systems to the limit in new york city, connecticut and parts of new rsey >> we keep missing trains because it's so packed you can't enter the trainsrs >> reporter: lines stretched for blocks as thousands of people tried to get to work. trains from new jersey to new york remained out, but key subway lines connecting manhattan to brooklyn under the east river werepen. and the statten island ferry was running. >> i don'think it's really normal for anyone right now.'t we have so much on our minds right now especially for those who have family that lost everything, you know. not normal yet. r:eporter: the trarns it challenges came on top of a cold night for thousands of people still with t power with temperatures dropping into the 30s.th >> we have hot soup, hot c
PBS
Nov 9, 2012 12:00am PST
in the wake of hurricane sandy. >> this is awful, this is just beyond, it's terrible, it's awful, i am done. >> mother nature is really killing us right now. sorry for whatever we did, we will make it up to you. >> it's snowing, this is like insult to injury, we just had a hurricane, now we 're having a blizzard. >> sreenivasan: the worst was the wind-- gusts of 50 to 60 miles an hour that blacked out customers who'd just had their power restored. by this morning, 750,000 homes and businesses were in the dark in the new york region-- 200,000 more than before the nor'easter hit. governor andrew cuomo charged utility companies planned poorly for "sandy" and are still playing catch-up. >> you look at what a utility company does and it basically comes down to wire and poles and crews and trucks. these are things you would want to have. how can you run out of poles? and then we have utility companies competing with each other to find the poles the way we competed to find crews and equipment. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, on the roads, the snow made bumper- to-bumper collisions a common sight, espec
PBS
Nov 15, 2012 6:30pm PST
benefits jumped to a one-and-a-half year high, surging 78,000, thanks to super- storm sandy. the total was 439,000. meantime, consumer inflation slowed to a one tenth of a percent increase, thanks to lower energy prices. without food and energy, core inflation was up two tenths of a percent. on wall street, the dow fell 28.5 points, the nasdaq was down almost ten, and the s&p 500 dropped two. if you want to know how the economy is faring, it pays to keep an eye on walmart. after all, it has over 10,000 stores across the globe, selling more than $1 billion worth of stuff every day. it earned $1.08 per share in the third quarter, a penny more than estimates, and up 11% from last year. but revenues were a little shy of forecast, and walmart's outlook for this quarter was less than anticipated. compare that to rival target's quarterly earnings-- four cents better than expectations at 81 cents a share and a holiday outlook that didn't disappoint. erika miller reports on what the results say about all-important the holiday season. >> reporter: $3.6 billion. that almost unthinkable number is
PBS
Nov 13, 2012 6:30pm PST
results don't even include the sales lift from superstorm sandy. home depot also raised its profit outlook for the year. if housing continues to improve, experts say it's a bullish sign for the rest of the economy. >> now, as we start to see residential investment recovery, that should help other sectors of the economy through demand for building materials, through more demand for other products-- furniture, you name it! >> reporter: she's optimistic housing will remain one of the few bright spots in an otherwise sluggish recovery. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: it was an unhappy earnings story in the third quarter for saks. the upscale department store said sales and profits were hurt by a modest spike in promotions. on top of that, saks expects sales to be flat in the current holiday period because of a slow start to november due to hurricane sandy. noow, trouble at saks underscores new worries spreading throughout the luxury sector about the all important holiday season. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: on manhattan's 5th avenue, it's beginning to look a lot like christm
PBS
Nov 14, 2012 6:30pm PST
slid 0.3% in october, more than expected, and the first decline in three months. hurricane sandy was behind at least some of the sales decline. but there are fresh worries today about the underlying strength of the american consumer. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: hurricane sandy is going to get blamed a lot in the coming weeks for soft economic data. and, rightfully so. after all the superstorm paralyzed a good chunk of the northeast for at least a week. that meant, no shopping, no eating out, and no filling up the tank. >> clearly, the retail sales data were weak and they were weak across a lot of categories. the commerce dept did talk about the affects on hurricane sandy on the numbers. but, it's hard to quantify. >> reporter: the question is whether that consumer paralysis will continue into the all important holiday retail season. many economists say that really depends on whether americans feel secure in the their jobs. here's the good news: there has recently been some improvement on the labor front. on top of that, many shoppers are finding their wallets are thicker
PBS
Nov 8, 2012 12:00am PST
hurricane sandy battered the region. police cars in new york city patrolled low-lying neighborhoods, urging people to evacuate again. the approaching nor'easter brought a wintry mix of cold and snow and possibly, minor flooding in already damaged coastal areas. new york mayor michael bloomberg: >> we haven't and won't order the kind of large scale evacuation we ordered in advance of hurricane sandy but if you are experiencing significant flooding during sandy you should consider taking shelter with friends and family at a safer spot or using one of the city's storm center shelters. >> sreenivasan: in new jersey, thousands of storm-weary people braced for their brush with the new storm, even as cleanup efforts continued from "sandy". governor chris christie suggested it was a little like the biblical plagues. >> when i finally got that final kind of, forecast that i got last night, i said i'm waiting for the locusts and pestilence next, you know. >> sreenivasan: the storm could al bring wind gusts of 65 miles an hour-- bedeviling efforts to restore power to more than 600,000 customers still
PBS
Nov 20, 2012 12:00am PST
the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don't. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elected senators. tonight: maine independent angus king. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: egypt's leaders tried today to mediate a truce between israel and hamas, but there was no outwar
PBS
Nov 26, 2012 6:30pm PST
at columbia university. >> susie: new damage estimates today on super storm sandy. the insurance industry will be on the hook for as much as $22 billion, according to numbers compiled by disaster-modeling firm air worldwide. the total is three billion less than the original tally, issued just after hurricane sandy made landfall in late october. >> tom: it was back to work for wall street, with the major stock indices ending mixed. the selling was stronger earlier in the day, with the s&p 500 hitting its lowest level of the session before noon eastern time. the losses were reduced in afternoon trade with the index finishing down just 0.2%. trading volume remains modest. 630 million shares on the big board. a tad over 1.6 billion on the nasdaq. the selling pressure showed up in the telecommunication sector, falling 1%. the energy and consumer staples sectors also fell. with so much focus on consumers and spending over the weekend, grocery stocks led the consumer sector lower today. super markets safeway and whole foods were down 3.2% and 3.1% respectively. kraft foods fell 2.1%. kraft trade
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)